Book Love

First Line Friday: Heart of a Royal

Welcome to First Line Friday, where book lovers across blogland share the opening line from a nearby book (since we all have books everywhere we turn). It’s a fun thing I hope to do more often in 2021, so I’m kicking off my participation for the New Year with a story from an Australian YA author I recently discovered:

Heart of a Royal by Hannah Currie

Heart of a Royal book cover

The first line is:

If mortification could kill, I’d be six feet under.

Talk about an opening line I could relate to (plus, what a gorgeous cover)! And so begins the story of Kenna, the companion/practically sister to Princess Alina of Peverell. But Kenna and Alina are about to turn 18 and Alina will soon be engaged to Prince Marcos of the neighboring kingdom — which means everything is about to change for both of them.

I enjoyed Heart of a Royal so much that I read it and the second story in the series, Heart of a Princess, about Princess Alina’s own journey over the 4-day weekend. They reminded me of the Selection Series by Kiera Cass, which is saying a lot.

The final book in the series, Heart of the Crown, releases next week: January 15. I’ll definitely be reading it and keeping an eye out for others by Hannah Currie. I’ve also been participating in Hannah’s Instagram challenge leading up to Heart of the Crown, if you want to check out the photos I’ve shared.

Your turn: Share the first line from one of your books in the comments. Then hop over to Hoarding Books (the blog I’m joining in this fun) to see what they’re sharing.

Happy reading!

Book Love

Three great YA books for giving (or reading yourself)

YA books have come a long way in the last 10 or so years. Yes, you’ll find some cheesy or cookie-cutter stories that don’t seem connected with today’s world (those still surface in every genre). But the young adult book market has become really competitive – which means higher expectations from publishers and better books for us as readers.

The YA titles on today’s shelves cover any genre you might want. And although a glance at their covers in the local bookstore might make it seem like they all tie in with dark topics, there are plenty that can entertain and challenge you without being something you would have hidden from your mom when you were 15.

Here are three I’ve read lately that are clean reads for teens – or anyone else – who want a great story that pulls you in and keeps you guessing on every page.

Book cover of Nine by Rachelle DekkerNine by Rachelle Dekker

Back cover copy: Some secrets can’t stay hidden. Zoe Johnson has spent most of her life living in the shadows, never drawing attention to herself, never investing in people or places. But when a wide-eyed, bedraggled teenager with no memory walks into the diner where Zoe works, everything changes.

Against her better judgment, Zoe, who has been trying to outrun her own painful memories of the past, finds herself attempting to help a girl who doesn’t seem to have any past at all. With little warning, they must follow the only sure thing they know: a woman hundreds of miles away will either save them … or be the last person to see them alive.

This book grabbed me within the first few pages, when the mother figure in Lucy’s life helps her escape from people who have been controlling her from birth. She sends Lucy to find another woman who can help; Lucy meets Zoe along the way and they both know nothing will be the same. The people who have controlled Lucy are hot on her trail and determined to do whatever it takes to keep her from exposing their work. Lucy and Zoe don’t even know each other, but still realize they can trust each other more than anyone else.

Everything about the story is believable and kept me guessing until the end. Even though I expected twists along the way, the story surprised me several times. And kept me up reading way past my bedtime more than one night.

I already have two more of her books on my to-be-read stack, if that tells you anything about how much I enjoyed Nine.

Book coer of Dust by Kara SwansonDust by Kara Swanson

Back cover copy: The truth about Neverland is far more dangerous than a fairy tale. Claire Kenton believes the world is too dark for magic to be real — since her twin brother was stolen away as a child. Now Claire’s desperate search points to London … and a boy who shouldn’t exist.

Peter Pan is having a beastly time getting back to Neverland. Grounded in London and hunted by his own Lost Boys, Peter searches for the last hope of restoring his crumbling island: a lass with magic in her veins.

The girl who fears her own destiny is on a collision course with the boy who never wanted to grow up. The truth behind this fairy tale is about to unravel everything Claire thought she knew about Peter Pan — and herself.

I’ve read quite a few fairytale retellings over the years and must say it’s hard to keep them from being predictable. Dust is different because it isn’t a new take on the all-too-familiar story of Peter Pan. Instead, it’s a modern-day tale of Peter doing whatever he can to get back to Neverland – and he’s not always the sunny, charming Peter you might expect. The book is written from both Claire’s and Peter’s points of view, so it’s fun to get inside both their heads.

Having a cover this gorgeous sets a high bar for the story – you don’t want to open something that striking and read junk! Fortunately, Dust definitely met the mark for me and I’ll be reading the sequel, Shadow, when it’s published in July 2021.

Book cover of Thirst by Jill WilliamsonThirst by Jill Williamson

Back cover copy: A waterborne disease has sprung up in every corner of the globe, decimating the human race. Seventeen-year-old Eli McShane and his friends flee the chaos and violence in Phoenix and journey north toward the rumored location of a safe water source. They add several to their number, including a mysterious girl named Hannah, who, unknown to Eli, is being hunted by a dangerous man. Desperation brings out the worst in many of the travelers, infecting even those closest to Eli. When division comes, will he be able to hold his group together or will each fall victim to their own thirst for survival?

I read a couple other books by Jill Williamson several years ago but missed this one when it came out in 2019. I’m glad I came across it a few weeks ago. It’s a good story with believable teenage characters and good lessons about friendship, leadership and growing in your faith. Not in a preachy way, but woven naturally into the story so that the points are made if you take time to stop and think.

Some people might not want to read Thirst right now since it centers on a pandemic, but that didn’t bother me. The follow-up book Hunger will be published next year and I’ll definitely want to read it to learn what happens to Eli and his friends.

 

There are lots of other great YA books I’ve enjoyed and recommend, but they’ll have to wait for another post. Nine, Dust and Thirst are from different categories of YA fiction, but trust me when I say any middle- or high school reader would probably like all three. And any adult, too – because even though they’re labeled as YA fiction, they’re so well written that they prove YA often is not just for kids anymore.

Book Love

Book Review: Morning for Dove

 

 

Morning for Dove by Martha Rogers (published by Realms, a Strang Company)

I normally post book reviews on Fun Read Friday, but sometimes I participate in blog tours that ask you to post reviews on certain days. That’s the case with Morning for Dove by Martha Rogers, so I’m happy to start out this week (and get back on track with posting — whew, what a crazy few weeks it’s been!) with my review.

Readers first met Dove Morris and Luke Anderson in Martha Rogers’s first book about the town of Barton Creek in Oklahoma Territory, Becoming Lucy. Dove and Lucy are close friends, so now it’s time to hear Dove’s story.

Morning for Dove takes place in 1897, when everyone in town knows everyone else and when expansion is making its mark whether people like it or not. Some changes, like the town’s first introductions to telegraph offices and ice boxes, are welcome. Others, like learning to live with people from different backgrounds or cultures, aren’t always welcome.

Feuds between cattlemen and ranchers, a theft during a town celebration, parents who try to plan their children’s lives, and the ever-present threat of wildfires because of an extended drought add layers of tension and conflict to the story. But I think the real issues at hand in Morning for Dove are prejudice and forgiveness.

Dove and her brothers are half Cherokee. Most people in town seem accepting of them and their mother, but a couple of influential women in town want nothing to do with them. One of those women, Bea Anderson, is Luke’s mother.

Luke and Dove have known each other for several years. When Luke finally sees Dove in a new light at Lucy’s wedding and wants to know her better, they both know his mother’s feelings about Native Americans. They pursue the relationship anyway with the help of friends Martin and Sarah, praying that Bea’s heart will change and trusting that God will work things out if they’re meant to be together. They soon reach the point of not being able to hide their feelings from others and Luke must stand up to his mother and her opinions.

By story’s end, Dove and Luke are together, their mothers have reconciled, and the bad guys have been dealt with (of course, you knew those things would happen because it’s a romance J). I won’t spoil the surprises along the way of how all these things happen – I’ll just say you should read Morning for Dove yourself. It was a sweet story that made me look inside my own heart and attitudes, but didn’t come across as preachy. The characters were likeable, the historical details well researched, the lessons true even in today’s world. I enjoyed Morning for Dove very much and look forward to the last book in the series, Finding Becky.

For more about author Martha Rogers, visit her blog or website.

Click here to get your own copy of Morning for Dove and to read some reviews.  Or, check out the first book in the Winds Across the Prarie series, Becoming Lucy.