Book Love, Christian fiction

Book reviews: A Dance in Donegal, The Paris Betrayal, and Bookshop by the Sea

Hi, everyone. A few weeks ago I introduced you to another website I launched earlier this year: Clean Fiction Book Reviews. In case you haven’t hopped over there yet, here are links to the latest reviews I’ve posted. I hope you’ll stop by and subscribe if you enjoy getting the scoop on books across different genres.

A Dance in Donegal by Jennifer DreibelA Dance in Donegal by Jennifer Deibel

Genre: Historical romance

Moira moved to Ireland to begin a teaching career — and get some answers about her mother’s past. That wasn’t all she found.

Rich details that help life in Ireland during that era come alive; lovable characters who teach lessons about faith, trust, and family even in the simplest of lives. This is Deibel’s debut novel and she’s an author to watch if you enjoy historical romance, especially stories set in Europe rather than the U.S.

 

The Paris Betrayal by James R HannibalThe Paris Betrayal by James R. Hannibal

Genre: Thriller

When everything — and everyone — you’ve counted on is gone, where do you turn? Especially when you’re a spy?

Constant twists and turns that take the reader from Italy to Paris to the U.S. and kept me guessing until the end. Super refreshing to read a thriller that was a fantastic, well-written story without the graphic language and scenes that can be so prevalent in this genre. Hannibal’s military background takes the realism to the next level. 

 

Bookshop by the Sea by Denise HunterBookshop by the Sea by Denise Hunter

Genre: Contemporary romance

An approaching hurricane, a stranded ex-boyfriend and a bookshop scheduled to open in a few weeks. What could possibly go wrong?

Fun, lighthearted, second-chance romance with characters who grew a lot but stayed believable. This was the perfect beach read while we were out of town and I can see myself reading it again when I’m in the mood for a pick-me-up book. Denise Hunter is the queen of heartwarming, small-town love stories.

What are you reading lately? I’m always looking for new books and authors to try. Leave a note in the comments to share.

Book Love, Christian fiction

Find a new Christian author through the 2021 Selah Award fiction winners

One of the biggest and most respected conferences for Christian writers was last week: the Blue Ridge Mountains Christian Writers Conference in North Carolina. They celebrate on the last night of the conference with the Selah Awards, which cover multiple categories of Christian fiction and nonfiction works that were published in the past year.

Books that win the Selah Award are definitely worth checking out, so I wanted to share them in case any look interesting to you.

This week I’m sharing the winners from the fiction categories, complete with links if you’d like to learn more. Next week I’ll share the nonfiction Selah Award winners. Happy browsing!

First Novel

Novella

Contemporary Women’s Fiction

Historical / Biblical Fiction

Historical Romance Fiction

Contemporary Romance Fiction

Romantic Suspense Fiction

Mystery/Suspense Fiction

Western Fiction

Speculative Fiction

General Fiction

YA Fiction

Middle Grade Fiction

What’s your favorite genre to read? I’ve added several of these titles to my own to-read list; would love to know if any look interesting to you.

If you’d like an even easier way to find new authors in the genres you enjoy, you can also sign up for my e-newsletter and get a free download of “75 Clean Fiction Authors Worth Reading.” It’s a great way to find a new favorite author this summer!


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Book Love, Christian fiction

Introducing Clean Fiction Book Reviews

Today I’d like to introduce a new website to you: Clean Fiction Book Reviews. In case you haven’t noticed the widget in the sidebar, it’s my new website where I’m posting reviews of many books I read.

Clean Fiction Book ReviewsWhy a second site? I love words and books and anything related to either (always have and expect I always will!). I read a lot, and across many genres. When I read a great book or discover a new-to-me author whose work I enjoy, I want to share that with others.

Plus, in case you didn’t realize it, writing and sharing reviews is one of the best ways you can help your favorite authors (other than buying their books, of course!).

I’ve been doing more of that in recent months on my Instagram page, but wanted to go further. So, Clean Fiction Book Reviews was born to house reviews of many books I read. I’ll still post some reviews here (especially for the 2021 Read Something New Book Challenge) but it’s nice to have a dedicated site for them.

Most of the books I post about are considered Christian fiction, but others would be classified as “clean” instead. These books don’t necessarily have an obvious Christian/faith-based message or plot thread, but they support a Christian worldview and don’t have foul language or super graphic scenes. I explain a bit more about my interpretation of “clean fiction” on that site.

The website still in its baby stages and will continue to grow, but I’d love for you to check it out and subscribe if you enjoy reading clean fiction and are interested in keeping up with my reviews. If you want to recommend a book for me to review, just drop me an email! And please tell your friends, since us bookish people know how fun it is to find new books and authors.

What have you read lately? I’ve just finished A Dance in Donegal, a historical romance set in Ireland, by debut author Jennifer Deibel. Share what’s on your reading stack. 🙂

Happy reading!


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Book Love

Book review: Court of Swans by Melanie Dickerson

Court of Swans by Melanie Dickerson is a reimagining of the Wild Swans tale and the first book in a new series of fairytale retellings set in medieval England. It was my choice for a young adult book for the April installment of the Read Something New in 2021 Book Challenge.

Back cover copy: Delia lives a quiet life as the daughter of an earl in late 14th century England, but that peace is shattered when her seven brothers are betrayed and falsely arrested. Meanwhile, with the Peasants’ Revolt threatening the peace of the kingdom, the king is executing anyone who had anything to do with the uprising. Delia is terrified her brothers will be next, the youngest of whom is only ten years old.

Delia infiltrates the palace as a seamstress so she can be near her brothers in the Tower of London and help them escape. When she runs into Sir Geoffrey, the guard captain who arrested her brothers, she hates him — until she discovers he has been secretly carrying food to her brothers in their prison cell.

Trapped into obeying the orders of his king, Sir Geoffrey is the oldest son of a duke whose estate has been seized by the king and his treacherous advisers. His first mission as captain was to arrest seven brothers for treason, but he had no idea that the brothers were so young or that their sister would be so feisty and beautiful.

In a court where everyone is eager to backstab anyone else to get what they want, how will Geoffrey right this wrong and help Delia and her brothers — especially when Delia hates him? And how will he keep them both from losing their heads to this execution-prone king?

My review: Most of the time when I read a book that’s based around a fairytale, I’m familiar with the original story so have an inkling of how some parts of the book will play out. That wasn’t the case with Court of Swans since I’m not familiar with the tale of the Wild Swans. I enjoyed that while reading because it meant I wasn’t sure what to expect (other than the usual happily ever after ending that’s always part of Dickerson’s books).

Delia and Geoffrey are sweet characters, though a bit shallow for my tastes. Delia is definitely an innocent, which is probably accurate for many young women her age at that time. But even with her innocence, I would have liked to get deeper into her mind and emotions.

Two threads ran throughout the book: Delia’s grappling with the question of why bad things happen to good people and her learning to trust that God was in control of every situation. Those are real world issues that we all face, which is why I would have liked them explored more.

Delia’s love for her brothers and absolute loyalty to them define much of who she is. She is willing to do anything within her power to help prove their innocence and free them from prison. She does make some mistakes along the way, especially because her personal tendencies to take everyone at their word make her an easy target for less-than-honest people.

There are things we can learn from that as readers, questions we can ask ourselves: How far am I willing to go for the people I love? Do I stand by them no matter what? But, at the same time, does my desire to help blind me to things that seem like obvious warning flags to others? Do I pray for — and wait for — God’s guidance or do I plow ahead on my own?

Bottom line: Although the characters and plot didn’t have the complexity I usually look for in a book, Court of Swans was a nice, lighter read.

Who should read it: Dickerson has a lot of adults in her reader fan base, but most of her books are marketed as young adult. Court of Swans fits that bill: the age of the main characters and the sweet romance make it a good choice for anyone but especially teens.

Next up: In May, the challenge is to reread something you enjoyed in middle or high school. I’m going with a classic: Where the Red Fern Grows. What are you reading right now?


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