Book Love, Christian fiction

Book Review: The Story Peddler by Lindsay A. Franklin

Book cover The Story PeddlerBack cover copy: Selling stories is a deadly business.

Tanwen doesn’t just tell stories — she weaves them into crystallized sculptures that sell for more than a few bits. But the only way to escape the control of her cruel mentor and claw her way from poverty is to set her sights on something grander: becoming Royal Storyteller to the king.

During her final story peddling tour, a tale of treason spills from her hands, threatening the king himself. Tanwen goes from peddler to prey as the king’s guard hunts her down … and they’re not known for their mercy. As Tanwen flees for her life, she unearths long-buried secrets and discovers she’s not the only outlaw in the empire. There’s a rebel group of weavers … and they’re after her too.

My review: My favorite part of The Story Peddler was the magical “system”—colored ribbons literally flow from the hands of people who are gifted as storytellers as they share tales of the kingdom, crystallizing into objects that represent the story. How cool (and imaginative) is that? Tanwen is exceptionally good at storytelling, especially considering that she’s not old enough to be a registered storyteller yet.

Years ago, storytellers were appreciated and had a wide repertoire from which to entertain their audiences. But that changed when King Gareth gained the throne and outlawed any stories that didn’t show him in a favorable light (known as “crowned stories”). Tanwen knows this and follows the rules when she’s selling stories. But odd feelings begin to crop up while she tells stories—odd feelings that get harder to squish into submission and that begin to show themselves as rogue story strands that alarm Tanwen, her listeners—and the king himself.

As Tanwen runs from the king and his henchmen, she learns valuable lessons in trust and loyalty from a rogue group of weavers who take her under their protection. She also learns that there’s a lot more to family than the people from your bloodline and that making dreams come true often involves layers both good and bad that you never imagined.

The story didn’t have a definitive faith plot thread, but that’s not a deal breaker for me. There are references to the state-sanctioned religion based on goddesses (which is quite corrupt and often ignored )and mentions of a Creator, but nothing extensive. Values such as honesty always being best—even when it carries a cost—are a big part of the story and Princess Braith is one of the few people close to the king who routinely shows compassion, acceptance, and forgiveness. That’s a message in itself: setting an example and standing true to your convictions no matter what the people around you might think.

Who should read it: Tanwen’s story continues with The Story Raider and The Story Hunter. I’m not planning to read them right now because I have so many other books on my to-read pile, but might look at them someday. If they’re along the same lines as The Story Peddler, I would classify them as good material for middle school or early high school. See my first peek at The Story Peddler in this First Line Friday post from January and learn more about author Lindsay A. Franklin on her website.

Book Love, Just for Fun, Writing life

‘I Love Words’ for Word Nerd Day

January 9 was Word Nerd Day, so today’s post shares a little fun in honor of that (because it’s almost as great in my word world as National I Love to Write Day in November).

Years ago, I participated in Career Day at our kids’ elementary school several times. I tried to change things up a bit each time since I would visit several classes and usually talk to some students who had heard me another time.

One year I wrote a poem to highlight the different things I would do as a writer – write content, edit or copy edit something another person wrote, or help someone with public relations or publicity.

And, even though I’ve never claimed to be a poet, here’s my tribute to word nerdiness.

I Love Words

By Leigh DeLozier

I love words.

Long or short, big or small –

Just give me words ’cause I love them all.

They’ll make you laugh, they’ll make you cry

They can paint pictures vivid as the sky.

I pull them together like beads on a string

Just give me a chance and you’ll learn something.

Because – I love words.

I love words.

I love what you wrote – really, I do

Now let’s make it shine with a change or two.

Why say ‘sit’ when you can use ‘slouch’?

And don’t settle for ‘chair’ when you really mean ‘couch.’

Cut a word here, change a phrase there

I make you look better, so please don’t despair.

Because – I love words.

I love words.

Typos and glitches fill me with fright

Dreams of misspellings haunt me by night.

Misusing ‘its’ or ‘their’ or ‘too’ –

It happens more often than you might think is true.

Some people believe I’m just fussy or picky

I promise I’m not – I just don’t want things to look icky.

Because – I love words.

I love words.

Radio, newspapers, Web or TV –

When there’s news to share, they’re all targets for me.

Need to raise money? Got a new book?

I’ll send out the info to get you a look.

My press release sings, the articles dance

I’d love to promote you – just give me a chance.

Because – I love words.

And: Speaking of word love, are you reading something for the 2021 Read Something New Book Challenge? January is historical fiction month. 🙂

Book Love

Read something new 2021 book challenge

I read a pretty wide variety of things but am always telling myself I should branch out more. 2021 will be my year to start, with a Read Something New book challenge. I would love for others to join!

Here’s how it will work.

stack of books against a yellow and blue backgroundA different genre or topic is assigned to each month of 2021. Toward the end of each month, I’ll post something here and on my social media pages reminding what the next month’s category is (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram). If you want to participate, read something in the category that month. It’s as easy as that!

The schedule is:

  • January: Historical fiction
  • February: Science fiction or fantasy
  • March: Fiction or nonfiction centered on a specific event or time period
  • April: Young adult
  • May: Reread a favorite from middle or high school
  • June: Contemporary fiction
  • July: A classic you’ve never read
  • August: Fiction or nonfiction that takes place in your state
  • September: Biography
  • October: Mystery or suspense
  • November: Fiction or nonfiction written by a local author
  • December: Something for personal growth

I’ll post reviews of whatever I read and invite you to share about yours in the comments. Join in whenever you want – you don’t have to commit to participating every month.

Plus: Anyone who shares about what they’ve read will be entered in some bookish prize drawings along the way.

So, let’s get ready for historical fiction in January. Plenty of amazing options there! I’m leaning toward Colors of Truth, which is the newest from Tamera Alexander. What are you thinking about?

Happy reading,

Leigh